Make a Book, Tell Your Story

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Oakland International High School is a new public high school for recent immigrants to the US. Located in Temescal, there are over 330 students speaking over 32 different languages, and most of them have only very recently arrived here. These students are all English-Language learners at the same time they are trying to learn all their high school curriculum, and many of them have never had any formal education before OIHS.

Some of OIHS’ 9th and 10th graders are coming to the East Bay Mini Maker Faire with a very cool project–a mini book lab.

With their Art teacher, Brooke Toczylowski, they have created personal Art Journals, and in World History with Teacher Verónica Garcia the students have made geography books about their home countries. They’ll show you theirs and they’ll teach you how to make some too.

This is an example journal from the students’ art class. This is used as a sketchbook and research workbook. This student is from Yemen, and has placed the US flag on one cover and the Yemen flag on the other, to tell a story about her identity and journey.

Come on down and meet some inspiring Young Makers!

MAKE and Maker Shed in the House! Raspberry Pi, MakerBots, Parallax +++

We’re lucky! Because we’re in the Bay Area, near enough to the home of Maker Faire founder, MAKE magazine, the MAKE crew will be trekking from Sebastopol (and parts all over the Bay) to come enjoy the Faire on Sunday.

But not just the magazine—since we’re so close to home, the retail front of MAKE, the Maker Shed, gets to come set up shop. They will be bringing a great array of kits for kids, Maker Faire and MAKE gear, Maker Media books—plus Parallax Elev8 QuadCopters, MakerBot Replicator 3D printers, and hard to find $25 RasberryPi computers.

AND the MAKE interns will be running our Learn to Solder booth, along with students from Lighthouse Community Charter School.

If you don’t know the background behind MAKE and Maker Faire:

Maker Faire started back in 2006 as a spin-off of MAKE magazine.  MAKE is a quarterly magazine that brings the do-it-yourself mindset to all the exciting projects in your life and helps you make the most of technology at home and away from home. It’s full of projects from beginner to expert.

The original Maker Faire entertains over 100,000 visitors in San Mateo over a weekend at the end of every May.  The other flagship event happens every fall in New York City (this year 55K attendees).  Mini Maker Faires have started to sprout up around the United States and the world, including events in Ann Arbor, Seattle, Tampa Bay, Kansas City, Shenzhen, Dublin, Brighton—and the East Bay!

Matt Heckert and Walk and Peck


Way back in the age of video tape, in the time before the Internet, a machine named Walk and Peck roamed the earth.

One of the stars of the seminal Survival Research Laboratories film “Bitter Message of Hopeless Grief” (1988), Walk and Peck (AKA The Centaur) also had a feature role in the 1985 performance, “Extremely Cruel Practices: Designed to Instruct Those Interested in Policies That Correct or Punish.” 

Walk and Peck’s maker, Matt Heckert, will be bringing the old W&P out for a little walkabout at the East Bay Mini Maker Faire this Sunday.

In the world of art+robots, Survival Research Laboratories (SRL) is considered to be the pioneer of the “spectacle” form of underground robotic art.” (Wikipedia). Remote control machines, often the size of small cars, interact with props and each other, producing mayhem, surprise, and destruction.

Heckert came to machines and engineering pretty early.  Obsessed with cars and Formula One racing, Heckert got his first car when he was 13 years old.  “It was a little Volvo 544 that I was going to make into a racecar. I was done with the lawnmower and the outboard motor; I wanted to have something to work on.”

Matt’s dad had seen this Volvo out in the country for sale, and tracked down the owner.  It turned out that this guy, Paul Krot, was a photographer and a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design (as well as founder of Sprint Systems Photography—still in biz), and had in fact raced the Volvo in some Sports Car Club of America runs.

Krot wouldn’t sell the car.  Instead he said, “I won’t sell it to you but I’ll give it to you if you will race it.”

Krot proceeded to take 13 year old Heckert to the junkyards to look for just the right motor.  “The motor was tired and bell housing was shot. I took my money that I had earned and bought this motor for $220.”

“He showed me how to port the manifold and what cam shaft to get and what grinds to put on the cam shaft.” Heckert was in business.  Re-reading the owner’s manual, Heckert would check in with Krot and follow his advice—but continue the work and progress on his own.

The point all of this is that this guy was that this guy dealt with me as if I had a brain, had the ability, and was an adult.  He never talked down to me. 

 I never forgot about Paul and my Volvo but I never really got a perspective on how important it was for me developmentally until I was reminiscing about it recently. That I had taken the initiative to get the car and then met Paul and his attitude was “you can do this,” without faint praise or hand-holding, and then completing gave me a sense of accomplishment that I carrier forward to future projects.

Heckert made his way from there to an award winning art career with exhibitions around the globe.  He is currently Chief Engineer for TCHO chocolate in San Francisco, having re-engineered their vintage East German chocolate manufacturing equipment into a full-scale production line on Pier 17.

He’s also currently saying goodbye to Walk and Peck, which has just been acquired by a museum. Come and pay a little homage Sunday at the Faire.

P.S. Check this shot below, the original wiring notes from the control box:

Riveropolis: A Watershed Installation for Boat Making and Magic

San Francisco artist Gregory Gavin says that since he was a kid he has “returned to creeks to feed my imagination.  Finally it occurred to me . . . it was the creek itself I wanted to return with from the forest.”

In a presentation at San Francisco’s de Young Museum in 2006, Gavin proposed perhaps the world’s first company specializing in the creation of miniature rivers. Since then, he has been creating rivers all over the Bay Area under the name Riveropolis. This Sunday, you’ll have the chance to experience two amazing undertakings:

First, Gavin will set up a kinetic, quiet large and fast moving play river to build and experiment with boats.

Then, inside the geometry of the Park Day gazebo, Gavin will construct  an idiosyncratic “archipelago” of floating islands “that I discovered this summer while teaching river camp.

Gregory will also participate on the 12PM “Maker Programs in East Bay Schools” panel presentation/discussion session in the Studio One Theater.

Gavin has been commissioned by National Endowment for the Arts, the de Young Museum, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Seattle Public Art Program, the Potrero Nuevo Fund Prize, and the Bay Area Discovery Museum. He teaches intermittently at the California College of the Arts and is a California Arts Council Fellow. He also teaches summer RIVER CAMP sessions at CAMP 510 at Park Day School, and the San Francisco School. We’re really excited to have him at the Faire!

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Mr. and Mrs. Maker: Jon Sarriugarte and Kyrsten Mate

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Did you get that enormous, weighty Restoration Hardware catalog (I mean “magazine”) about a month ago? Heavy as the heaviest September Vogue?  Maybe you noticed in there a giant feature spread on their new lighting designer,  “Oakland Oilpunk,” blacksmith Jon Sarriugarte.

Or maybe you saw The Avengers, Brave, War Horse, The Incredibles, TRON Legacy, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Peter Pan, HULK or Lord of the Rings?  Then award-winning Skywalker Sound sound editor/sound designer Kyrsten Mate might ring a bell if you are in the local movie biz or a film credit junkie.

Better yetmaybe you went to Burning Man over the last 5+ years and saw the Serpent Twins, the Golden Mean snail car, or the Electrobite Olenoides?

Kyrsten Mate and Jon Sarriugarte are the dynamic power maker couple behind these extraordinary art cars.  They do these projects with (talented) friends on top of holding demanding day jobs and being parents to their Zolie Mae.

Their combined aesthetic prowess and extreme craftsmanship—along with the strength of their greater team—result in just plain stunning projects.  Come meet Jon and Kyrsten at 2PM in the Studio One Theater, see more of their work, hear some great stories… and get inspired!

Have You Found What You Love To Do? Workshop Weekend Will Inspire You

Gil and J.D. Zamfirescu say they feel lucky to have discovered “a few of our own passions early on in life.”

Which led both brothers to MIT, where Gil earned his degree in economics and J.D. earned degrees in computer science. Gil went on to found FertilGas, an initiative dedicated to sustainable energy technology in Honduras. And J.D. co-founded Appjet, which was acquired by Google in 2009.

“Our experiences growing up inspired us to create Workshop Weekend,” the Zamfirescu brothers say. “We think everyone, young and old, should have the opportunity to discover [their] passion, and that belief has driven us to put together Workshop Weekend: It’s a way to encourage that exploration of passions.”

Workshop Weekend you ask?  Workshop Weekend is a pop-up maker university.  Take (or teach!) 1-3 hour workshops on science, technology, engineering, art, and more.  The next full-scale Workshop Weekends coming up is:
» November 10-11, 2012 at Tech Liminal and other venues in downtown Oakland

HOWEVER…  We’re excited to announce a “mini” Workshop Weekend at the East Bay Mini Maker Faire! Workshops will run through the day Sunday in their room upstairs in Studio One.  Workshops include:
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Accessorize Your Style: Clay Jewelry Making and Button Making

Patrick Schmidt is the owner of a brand new art gallery in Berkeley. The art of millefiori (pronounced mil-uh-fee-awr-ee) — employed in Patrick’s clay jewelry workshop — was first discovered in Ancient Roman times. The technique was subsequently lost for more than a thousand years until the 19th century, when a couple of crafty folks where able to figure out the process from scratch!

You’ll learn the technique in this workshop, and, as a bonus, you’ll be able to make your very own button.
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Sewing Up a Storm! Machine Sewing, Hand Sewing, and Using a Serger — Halloween Style! (pictured above)

Michelle Adam — a magnificent fashion maestra specializing in scrapcycling, the art of repurposing old or worn-out fabrics into completely new items — is currently working on her master’s degree in fashion design at the Academy of Art University.

“I like to make a game out of it by trying to see how much I can create from irregular pieces of fabric that others would consider useless,” Michelle says.

Michelle will teach you three essential sewing techniques: hand-sewing, machine sewing, and using a serger. You’ll use your skills to sew together a Halloween-themed item which you can take home with you!

“One of the first fashion pieces Michelle ever made was a dress made entirely of Post-It notes,” Gil says. “It was meant to represent women’s ability to multitask, and one of her professors fell so in love with it that she bought it off of her!”
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DIY Extraction: Getting Vanilla Flavor Out of Vanilla Beans!

Oakland-based Andrew Milmoe is a maker and educator extraordinaire. He founded the “Make:SF” community of makers and explorers, and has taught or assisted in over 100 workshops over the past few years.

You’ll take home a bottle of your very own vanilla extract to use in homemade cookies, ice cream — whatever you like!

FIND WORKSHOP WEEKEND UPSTAIRS IN STUDIO ONE.  See the SCHEDULE page for complete lineup and times.

Makers: Crash the Faire!

Announcing the Pop-Up Maker Share Zone!
Hey Folks, this suggestion just popped up from Jeff Edmonston — East Bay Dad/Maker/EBMMF Facebook friend.  Thanks Jeff!

Got a great idea or presentation and didn’t have the bandwidth to apply by our deadline? Buy a ticket to the Faire and bring your project to our Pop-Up Maker Share Zone

Bring your DIY project, your hacked up wonders, your art, and your smile.
The Community Share Zone is an area where you can show off your projects and check out what your other Makers have been doing.

Amaze friends and strangers, start an impromptu circuit bending music jam, let your LEDs shine.  You don’t need to have a full scale booth or fancy presentation to share your stuff at the East Bay Maker Faire, just be willing to demo and talk about your project, meet others in the community and exchange ideas.  Have something awesome you made from Adafruit, Sparkfun, Make Weekend Projects, Instructables, or any of the many kit makers and idea markets that have exploded to fill our idle hours with joy? Bring it out and share your enthusiasm with others.  This is not for adults only – let the kids bring their first soldering creations, bugbots, models, science fair projects, EVERYTHING!

Don’t have something to share?  Make sure to come by here and see projects that people have made their very first time soldering or creating, get inspired at the Pop-Up Maker Share Zone

Crash the Faire!

Guidelines:

  • Table space will be provided
  • No consumables (food and drinks) please
  • No high voltage or dangerous/hazardous items please
  • If you have a really big project or lots of stuff, please only bring what you can carry while enjoying the rest of the fair.  There is no storage space.
  • Please do not leave any presentation items unattended that are of personal value to you.
  • This is an “impromptu” or “pop-up” space that will be self-staffed by the faire participants.
  • You are entirely responsible for the items you bring.

 

Get yer Swap on Folks!

If you’re coming to the East Bay Mini Maker Faire, you gotta make stuff while you’re here. What better place than our Hands-On-Everything Zone at Studio One?

Tip from the Top: plan ahead for the Swap experience and bring a shirt to screenprint, and some clothes you either want to donate or something you’ve been dying to jazz up.

Swap-O-Rama-Rama is the brainchild of Wendy Tremayne, an inspired artist/maker/yogini/homesteader. Basically, its a clothing swap, a sewing room, a hackerspace, and a series of DIY/DIT (do it together) projects. Bring along some clothes or all that extra fabric you’ve been meaning to use. Grab something and turn it into something else. Make a Halloween costume, a cape, a costume, a monster or a miniskirt. Make a stuffed animal or a tea cozy or a shopping bag, a book cover or a tutu….use your imagination or avail yourself of ours!

This year, our sewing maven CC Clark is back in action with her rotary cutters, sewing machines, notions, trims, fabrics and projects galore. In addition, workshop artists Cedar Casper (young maker extraordinaire) will teach you to make a jeans purse and Jennifer Williams will get you cutting up old t-shirts to make TARN (t-shirt yarn) you can crochet into all kinds of neat stuff. Iggy from the East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse will return as well, and make cars out of old floppy disks. Remember those?

Next door to the Swap/Sewing room is the Screenprinting Zone. This is the place to take any t-shirt, hoodie, skirt, totebag or any piece of fabric you can lay your hands on and transform it into something cool. The artists and homies from Oakland’s  Homeygrown collective will bring their original designs and help you create your very own work of art.

Also–thanks to 510 Families for helping promote the Faire and all our crafty efforts!

A HUGE Shout Out to Our Sponsors!

If you’ve visited our website over the past couple of months you might have noticed that the list of sponsor logos on the right side of the page has been growing.

We are deeply thankful for our event Sponsors–they help us cover the costs of producing this hands-on, fun-filled, inspirational juggling act we call the East Bay Mini Maker Faire.

The 2012 lead sponsors to date are:  Make Magazine, Park Day School, Studio One Art Center, City National Bank, Clif Kid, Brushstrokes Studio, Orange Door Properties, Galileo Learning, and CAMP 510. You guys rock!

Please frequent their businesses, buy their products, and stop by their booths at the Faire–Clay Sculpting with Brushstrokes, Seed Bombs with Orange Door Properties, Cob Oven Pretzel Making and Tasting with CAMP 510, Masks and Crown Eco-Crafts with Clif Kid, and A Shake and Quake Test Center with Galileo Learning.

We also are extremely grateful to Project 6, Greener Printer, and Lansharks who donated their time and services to help us with little things like design, printing, and wireless technology.

And our media sponsors did what they do best and got the word out to all of you.  Thanks to East Bay Express, Berkeleyside, Oakland Local, 510Families, and Edible East Bay.

See you all in four days!

Giant Public Art Coming Your Way: The Bay Lights


The Bay Lights is coming to the West Span of the Bay Bridge in 2013.

It is an large-scale civic art installation created by internationally renowned artist Leo Villareal, with over 25,000 white energy-efficient LEDs installed on the vertical cables of the West Span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

From my post earlier this year on makezine.com:

Proposed by artist Leo Villareal, The Bay Lights project will be a grid of 25,000 white LEDs spaced every foot on the suspension cables. “Each node will be individually addressable…each single pixel is controllable but working as a group to create an overall effect,” says Villareal.

Villareal has developed custom software and utilized Max/MSP/Jitter to get to a place of nuanced, three-layer control of the grid — something akin to video mixing. “It’s a long a process of making these discoveries, layering, refining; it becomes kind of like painting.

A graduate of ITP at NYIU, Villareal used to make his own LED boards and sequencers — when he was working with a microcontroller and 16 lights.  Now Villareal leverages commercially available Phillips hardware, but is deep into designing custom enclosures that could secure and protect the Bay Lights grid over its two-year lifespan.

Come meet members of the team behind this idea-gone-real, the makers behind making the largest light sculpture in the world. The LARGEST LIGHT SCULPTURE IN THE WORLD! In our backyard. Next year.

3PM Presentation Stage in the Studio One Theater.